Il Silenzio and Bugle Call A.k.a. Taps

Posted in: Musicouching by Westbrook on June 30th, 2009 | 59 Comments

Il silenzio is an Italian song written by and played beautifully on the trumpet by Nini Rosso (1925-1994). A variation of the song is known as the Bugle Call a.k.a. Taps and is played beautifully on the trumpet by Melissa Venema, a 13 year old girl at the time.

IL SILENZIO

Italian Nini Roso was a great trumpeter in Europe. His Il silenzio is a haunting sound that moves most who hear it. He wrote it in 1965 and it sold 10 million copies that year. It stayed number one in many European countries that year and remained at the top of the charts for a long time.

BUGLE CALL, a.k.a. TAPS

A very close variation of IL silenzio by the Italian Nini Rosso is the BUGLE CALL, a.k.a. TAPS, universal among almost all the armed forces of the world…a sad and beautiful thing to hear. Melissa Venema, 13 years old at the time who has terrific breath power played this song on the trumpet in an Andre Rieu’s concert performed early 2008 in the Amsterdam Arena, Netherlands.  Listening and watching her is mesmerizing and the effect goes to my soul as if she were an angel.

To those who may argue that this song is strictly Il silenzio, I must redirect you to the first sentence above. I mentioned that Melissa is playing a VARIATION of IL silenzio – there are many versions of Il silenzio. This version is often thought of by many in the military as Taps; many have no idea Il silenzio exists. Taps was originally written by Brigadier Daniel Butterfield, an American Civil War general in July, 1862. I was in the military and taps was played at days end, and I can say with certainty that this version of Il silenzio is close enough to General Butterfields original Taps to stir the same emotions.

The videos are not of the correct format to enter here, so rather than go through the process of converting them, I thought I would let you see and listen to them on my blog.  Please click on this link,

http://wdcplace.blogspot.com, go to full screen and turn up your volume.  Click on each video to enjoy these very special and beautiful songs played by two very talented artists/musicians of the likes that you will never forget.  Please leave your comments and let me know what you think of them.

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59 Responses to “Il Silenzio and Bugle Call A.k.a. Taps”
  • goodselfme June 30th, 2009 at 10:24 am

    TX for this info and the lead.Unfortunately my sound is not working so will not be able to listen.

  • Ruby Hawk June 30th, 2009 at 10:17 pm

    I love the bugle,One of my favorite instruments.

  • Westbrook July 1st, 2009 at 7:49 am

    I hope you all checked out the video of the little girl who played Taps on her bugle in front of a big orchestra in Austria. Everyone there was mesmorized by her.

  • cj chamul July 11th, 2009 at 2:34 pm

    I love “Il Silenzio” and in the video it is beatifully performed by Melissa Venema. Taps, however, is not a variation of it but the opposite. Note that “Il Silenzio” was written in 1965 where “Taps” was written more than 100 years before by Gen. Dan Butterfield in 1862.

  • CutestPrincess July 19th, 2009 at 9:48 am

    interesting… i’ll check it out…

  • Louie Jerome July 20th, 2009 at 9:14 am

    Interesting information.

  • K Kristie July 20th, 2009 at 9:17 am

    Nice piece, thanks for sharing.

  • Westbrook July 20th, 2009 at 10:18 am

    CJ Chamul’s comment above is factually correct, however, I would not say that Taps is the “opposite” of il silenzio. It is a very close variation of the “type” of music as ilsilenzio, which I should have made clear in my description…it is what I meant to convey. (It is clear in my description on my blog.) Who wrote both songs and when they were written are well known by most music buffs of this kind of music.

  • Ruby Hawk July 21st, 2009 at 7:43 pm

    She is amazing. You wouldn’t think a fragile little girl would have the power. She is wonderful. I came by to listen again.

  • rj1smith July 23rd, 2009 at 2:51 pm

    A trumpet is NOT a bugle. I love the video. The young girl is very talented, and the arrangement is lovely, but very few people in the world can play the bugle anymore. If anyone shows me a video of a bugler playing IL Silenzio this well, I would be in awe. As it is; many accomplished trumpeters could play this as well as the young girl.

  • Westbrook July 23rd, 2009 at 7:03 pm

    I don’t mean to be rude, but I am not sure what rj1smith is responding to. I did not say a trumpet is a bugle. I clearly indicated that the little girl playing Taps is using a bugle and Nini Rosso plays Il silenzio on a trumpet. The only thing in the article that may cause some confusion is where I said the girl played a variation of il silenzio on the bugle. Maybe I should have said a variation of “the type” of music. I did make this clear in my blog, http://wdcplace.blogspot.com.

  • Westbrook November 11th, 2009 at 11:13 pm

    I confess that I did make a couple of mistakes in this article. After someone brought it to my attention and after some research, I must admit to my mistakes. First, the young girl played Bugle Call a.k.a. Taps on a trumpet, not a bugle.Secondly, I said she played Bugle Call with Andre Rieu in Austria. I believe that is wrong. From what I discovered, they were playing in a concert in the Amsterdam Arena, Netherlands. Additionally, her name is Melissa Venema and the concert occurred in early 2008. She has a website at Melissavenema,nl Sorry for the mistakes. I hope this redeems me.

  • Westbrook November 12th, 2009 at 12:04 am

    Okay, scratch the comment above regarding mistakes. I corrected all the problems in the article. I wasn’t sure I could do that but to my surprise, the corrections were immediate.

  • biljopal November 16th, 2009 at 11:19 pm

    When you say that Taps is a variation of the type of music as Il Silenzio, that implies that Silenzio came first, which of course it didn’t.
    The girl is playing Il Silenzio, not Taps.
    Several people on You Tube, includng one veteran, are confused and think she’s playing Taps. Whether or not they’re buffs of this kind of music, I have no way of knowing.

  • Westbrook November 17th, 2009 at 12:04 pm

    To those, such as biljopal (his comment above) who may think this song is not Bugle Call or Taps, rather it is Il Silenzio, I must point out that I mentioned that Melissa is playing a VARIATION of IL Silenzio, and this version is known by the American military, and around the world, as the Bugle Call or Taps. It is a fact that Taps was originally written by Brigadier Daniel Butterfield, an American Civil War general in July, 1862. I am a military veteran and I listened to taps at the end of many days when I served and I can say with certainty that this rendition of Taps is close enough to General Butterfields original Taps. I will try to add this information to the article.

  • Westbrook November 17th, 2009 at 7:52 pm

    I am sorry that I am making so many comments to my article, but each time I make one, I later realize it was misleading or not clear. The following is my corrected response to biljopal, as mentioned above: To those who may argue that this song is strictly Il silenzio, I must redirect you to the first sentence of the article. I mentioned that Melissa is playing a VARIATION of IL silenzio – there are many versions of Il silenzio. This version is often thought of by many in the military as Taps; many have no idea Il silenzio exists. Taps was originally written by Brigadier Daniel Butterfield, an American Civil War general in July, 1862. I was in the military and taps was played at days end, and I can say with certainty that this version of Il silenzio is close enough to General Butterfields original Taps to stir the same emotions.

  • Dave November 17th, 2009 at 7:55 pm

    You say “universal among almost all the armed forces of the world”. Taps is used by the US and possibly other countries but the British and most Commonwealth countries use “The Last Post”.

  • William Brown November 20th, 2009 at 7:25 am

    I’m a newbie here, but have a bit of musical experience.

    1. Instrument is definitely a trumpet.
    2. Piece was written in 1965. Taps was (slightly disputed) written in 1862.
    3. Version performed is one of many variations of Il Silenzio.

    But. Much of the haunting quality seems to come from the reverb effect that may have been added 1) in the sound system or 2) in post-production. While the young lady is extremely talented, it appears that the sound has been enhanced.

    I’ll put my firesuit on now as the flames begin.

  • Westbrook November 20th, 2009 at 9:19 am

    Thanks for your opinion Dave. When I stated that Taps is universal around the world, I didn’t mean that every country actually plays it, but many countries play some variation of Taps, and certainly it is well known around the world.

    Thanks William for reiterating the facts that I stated.

  • Leonard December 9th, 2009 at 5:32 pm

    Nitpick, nitpick, nitpick! How many of all you nitpickers out there could play a trumpet at age 13 like this girl can? Why can’t you leave well enough alone and enjoy the beautiful music?

  • Westbrook December 9th, 2009 at 6:16 pm

    Someone sent me an anonymous email message, which I have included here (I will comment on it next.):

    Your information about Il Silenzio that’s posted on musicouch is very misleading. I have played the trumpet my entire life. I have heard both Il Silenzio and TAPS. I have played TAPS at many a funeral during my US. NAVY career, and nothing stirs up the emotions quite like it. The only similarities amongst the 2 songs is the basic g, c, e, g jumps. While both songs are beautiful, PLEASE never confuse Nino Rosso\’s beautiful song with our own TAPS. Too many people will wonder why we don\’t play the full version of TAPS at funerals if they believe there is any relation.
    Thank You,
    PO2 David L

  • Westbrook December 9th, 2009 at 6:41 pm

    Now, I respect David’s comment and his opinion above, but I have to say he is wrong. I pulled this video from a military social network, where it is known by many as Taps. Taps is included as one of the military’s Bugle Calls. Bugle calls is a group of many songs. Probably the best known bugle call is Reveille. There are many people who have posted videos of Taps on the web. For example, check out: youtube.com/watch?v=Wn_iz8z2AGw. Notice the available military songs to the right of the video. Scrolling through them you will see Melissa’s song, which is called “Girl Playing Taps.” This is the same video that I have presented here, but from a different source. The link to this one is: youtube.com/watch?v=4WRoWPhLU2Q&feature=related. Listen to both of these songs and you will hear how very similar they are. Yes, Melissa is playing a version of Il silenzio, but her version is similar and known by many as Taps. David mentions that he was in the military and therefore, he should know. I was also in the military – in fact I am a Vietnam War Veteran. He is right that these songs stir deep emotions, but, I am sorry, he is wrong that Melissa’s version of Il silenzio (Taps) and Brigadier Daniel Butterfield\’s Taps are not similar. .

  • Westbrook December 10th, 2009 at 5:43 pm

    The following is another anonymous message that I received regarding my article, to which I will respond:

    In regard to the posting of 12/9/2009 at 5:58PM. David didn’t say they weren’t similar. He said there is no relationship between the two pieces of work. Which is a true statement. They were written over 100 years apart and one is a classical music piece and the other a homage to the end of the day/or the laying to rest of the soul of a dead military personage.

    My Response:
    Thank you for your comment, however, I am not sure why there are people having trouble with what I am saying in this article. I stand on my response to David’s comment. I have clearly stated in my article and in comments that the original military Taps was written in 1862 by a Brigadier general and that Melissa played a version of Il silenzio at the age of 13 in 2008, of which sounds much like and accepted by many, including many in the military.as a variation of Taps. I disagree that there is no relationship between the two. Granted, there is no relationship in terms of when they where written and their purposes, but there is an “association” between the two in that many hear both of them as Taps. An association between two things is considered a relationship. Look it up in the dictionary. I do not mind comments, so if you want to make a comment, please do so.

  • US Veteran December 13th, 2009 at 9:28 pm

    I have spent 19 years in the US Army and have heard all of what’s left of the Bugle Calls.

    First, Bugle Calls are a collection of many different “songs” played on the bugle to announce troop formations, attack calls, time of day, etc., just like flags were used in the Roman and Crusades times to signal troops. Taps is just ONE of the many Bugle Calls. Not THE Bugle Call.

    Second, to say that this is a rendition of Taps, is like saying that when a rapper “samples” some other music, that the rapper is in fact performing a rendition of that sampled song. Although I have never heard the original 1965 version of Il Silenzio, and therefore cannot comment on what it sounds like, Melissa’s version basically “samples” Taps. Yes, she is very talented and the piece she plays is very stirring, in the same way that Taps is, and I take nothing away from her talent or the beauty of this melody. The problem that many on here have is when you say that this IS a version of Taps, when it clearly is not.

    Taps is a melody that many, especially in the military, hold near and dear. This, although a beautiful melody, and reminiscent of Taps, is not Taps.

  • Westbrook December 14th, 2009 at 12:56 pm

    To US Veteran

    First, I can only guess that you did not read all of the comments following this article. If you had, you would have noticed that you are just reiterating what I already said that Bugle Calls is a collection of different songs, of which Taps is one of them – read my second comment above. When I named the article, “Bugle Call a.k.a. Taps,” I meant “Bugle call” figuratively.

    Secondly, although I am also a military veteran, I don’t just dream up an article like this. I took my cue from a military social network, TroopSpace.net, where Melissa’s version of Il silenzio is thought by many as also a rendition of Taps, and is included as one of their songs in their bugle calls. You are encouraged to check out their bugle calls to verify this. You concede that Melissa plays a “sample” of Taps. If you had read my comments following my article, you would have known that I have stated over and over that she does not play the original and true Taps, only a song that many who hear it associates it to the real thing.

    By the way, you should listen to Il silenzio. I think you would enjoy it. It follows Melissa’s song on my blog, wdcplace.blogspot.com.

  • Westbrook December 14th, 2009 at 12:57 pm

    To US Veteran
    First, I can only guess that you did not read all of the comments following this article. If you had, you would have noticed that you are just reiterating what I already said that Bugle Calls is a collection of different songs, of which Taps is one of them – read my second comment above. When I named the article, “Bugle Call a.k.a. Taps,” I meant “Bugle call” figuratively.

    Secondly, although I am also a military veteran, I don’t just dream up an article like this. I took my cue from a military social network, TroopSpace.net, where Melissa’s version of Il silenzio is thought by many as also a rendition of Taps, and is included as one of their songs in their bugle calls. You are encouraged to check out their bugle calls to verify this. You concede that Melissa plays a “sample” of Taps. If you had read my comments following my article, you would have known that I have stated over and over that she does not play the original and true Taps, only a song that many who hear it associates it to the real thing.

    By the way, you should listen to Il silenzio. I think you would enjoy it. It follows Melissa’s song on my blog, wdcplace.blogspot.com.

  • Westbrook December 14th, 2009 at 12:59 pm

    US Veteran
    First, I can only guess that you did not read all of the comments following this article. If you had, you would have noticed that you are just reiterating what I already said that Bugle Calls is a collection of different songs, of which Taps is one of them – read my second comment above. When I named the article, “Bugle Call a.k.a. Taps,” I meant “Bugle call” figuratively.

    Secondly, although I am also a military veteran, I don’t just dream up an article like this. I took my cue from a military social network, TroopSpace.net, where Melissa’s version of Il silenzio is thought by many as also a rendition of Taps, and is included as one of their songs in their bugle calls. You are encouraged to check out their bugle calls to verify this. You concede that Melissa plays a “sample” of Taps. If you had read my comments following my article, you would have known that I have stated over and over that she does not play the original and true Taps, only a song that many who hear it associates it to the real thing.

    By the way, you should listen to Il silenzio. I think you would enjoy it. It follows Melissa’s song on my blog, wdcplace.blogspot.com.

  • Westbrook December 14th, 2009 at 1:00 pm

    US Veteran
    First, I can only guess that you did not read all of the comments following this article. If you had, you would have noticed that you are just reiterating what I already said that Bugle Calls is a collection of different songs, of which Taps is one of them – read my second comment above. When I named the article, “Bugle Call a.k.a. Taps,” I meant “Bugle call” figuratively.

    Secondly, although I am also a military veteran, I don’t just dream up an article like this. I took my cue from a military social network, TroopSpace.net, where Melissa’s version of Il silenzio is thought by many as also a rendition of Taps, and is included as one of their songs in their bugle calls. You are encouraged to check out their bugle calls to verify this. You concede that Melissa plays a “sample” of Taps. If you had read my comments following my article, you would have known that I have stated over and over that she does not play the original and true Taps, only a song that many who hear it associates it to the real thing.

    By the way, you should listen to Il silenzio. I think you would enjoy it. It follows Melissa’s song on my blog at, wdcplace.blogspot.com.

  • Westbrook December 14th, 2009 at 1:01 pm

    US Veteran
    First, I can only guess that you did not read all of the comments following this article. If you had, you would have noticed that you are just reiterating what I already said that Bugle Calls is a collection of different songs, of which Taps is one of them – read my second comment above. When I named the article, “Bugle Call a.k.a. Taps,” I meant “Bugle call” figuratively.

    Secondly, although I am also a military veteran, I don’t just dream up an article like this. I took my cue from a military social network, TroopSpace.net, where Melissa’s version of Il silenzio is thought by many as also a rendition of Taps, and is included as one of their songs in their bugle calls. You are encouraged to check out their bugle calls to verify this. You concede that Melissa plays a “sample” of Taps. If you had read my comments following my article, you would have known that I have stated over and over that she does not play the original and true Taps, only a song that many who hear it associates it to the real thing.

    By the way, you should listen to Il silenzio on my blog at wdcplace.blogspot.com. I think you would enjoy it. It follows Melissa’s song,

  • Westbrook December 14th, 2009 at 1:08 pm

    I have no idea what happened here. I tried to submit my latest comment and got a “server error.” several times. Each time the error stated that my comment could not be published, but here we are with 5 iterations of it. I am sorry for this snafu.

  • Rick December 22nd, 2009 at 1:01 pm

    Just came across Melissa\’s film clip yesterday, and played it over about six times and each time was rewarded with a lump in the throat and watery eyes. Passed it on to some close friends who were moved as I have been. As a Navy vet, I havn\’t heard that version before, and it simply does not get any better than the young ladys rendition. Stop argueing and celebrate the sound and be thankful that we can enjoy this fine music. Someone should get Melissa to record her talent using quality recording equipment, and let her do all versions of the works.

  • Westbrook December 22nd, 2009 at 7:30 pm

    Thank you Rick! I second your suggestion to quit arguing about every little detail and enjoy the sound. I also thank Leonard for his comment, above, that people should quit “nitpicking” and enjoy the sound. I respect everyone’s opinions and their comments, but as I mentioned in my article, it goes deep to my soul and it is very special to me. I put the video on here to share it, knowing it will affect many in the way that you, Rick, described it affecting you.

  • Mike January 10th, 2010 at 2:37 am

    I played it 8 times tonight…beautiful, just beautiful. I am an active duty Air Force member with 25.5 yrs and loved every note!!! Thanks for sharing and I will be sharing it also.

  • Nina January 13th, 2010 at 10:07 pm

    First let me say that this is beautiful. I listened to both and they are equally awesome. The discussions led me to do some digging of my own and from what I can tell all of these “evolved” from a napoleonic era bugle call for “lights out”. So it was used by the French, then British adapted it for them, and the US adapted it for their use. Indeed it was further adapted by Daniel Butterfield during the civil war and finally adopted in the version we here in the US are accustomed to today. Some believe Il silenzio was adapted from the original version of ‘lights out”. I really don’t care what you call it or how it came into being (digging into the history was fun for me). To think that with just 8 notes of music we can achieve the beautiful music that we have in this world is to me miraculous and I will enjoy it all if I have enough time on this earth. I have listened to both these throughout the afternoon and evening and it has lifted my soul – and isn’t that what music is about?

  • Ian Stares January 16th, 2010 at 6:21 am

    I have been playing bugle calls at Funerals & Cermonys for some years in Australia & have also played in the USA. I am a guest to this site & like to add a comment.
    I have acess to a video copy of Il Silenizo being played by a Military Personel on a bugle. I`m led to beleive that it was a bugle call that was or maybe still used by the Italian Military for Funeral honors. Being played on open notes, it is quite different to the modern version that we all know. I don`t know of the history & how long of it`s existance
    Nini Roso in 1965 revamped the tune which took the world by storm.

  • Westbrook January 16th, 2010 at 12:56 pm

    Very interesting information Ian and thanks for your comment. I am sure the information you are providing is not well known. I am also sure that many would love to hear the version of Il Silenzio played at funerals by the Italian military on a bugle.

  • Westbrook January 16th, 2010 at 1:17 pm

    Nina, I am glad that you took the time to dig into the histories of these songs. I believe you would agree that research reveals that not everything is simply black or white, as some may think. Thank you for your time and comment. Both of these songs have a profound affect on anyone who listens to them. It is almost impossible to not be moved by them or to just listen to them only once.

  • Gary Ziems January 31st, 2010 at 7:06 pm

    I have heard that “Il Silenzio” was an anthem used during the Vietnam War – Is this true & if so which force used it??

  • Alex Vega April 28th, 2010 at 8:44 pm

    to whoever can help….I would like to get the music to this piece but as I am computor illiterate I don’t know where or how to look. Beautiful music by one so young.

    Alex

  • Linda June 4th, 2010 at 9:05 pm

    The title of this article is IL SILENZIO BUGLE CALL, a.k.a. TAPS. AKA means ALSO KNOWN AS.
    This simply is not true. You should change the name of the article, as people around the internet believe that one song is the other. Comment all you want. Your title is still bogus.

  • R.E.Demick September 21st, 2010 at 8:27 pm

    I feel bad that I have never heard this before today. I was very visiably moved by both versions. I thought the young lady’s version was great till I heard the one by Nino Roso. Few pieces of music have touched me like this one does. Once again I have to say it’s been my loss for not having heard it years ago. It takes me back to a time that I’m sure we would all like to remember differently. We lost so many Fathers, Mothers, Sisters, Brothers And so many others. This piece of music is absolutely perfect for them.

  • Ursula October 5th, 2010 at 1:14 pm

    Are the dates correct, 1965? It seems that I have heard it on the radio in Germany in 1989?

  • Westbrook October 21st, 2010 at 9:14 am

    Linda. If you have read all the comments, which is generally a debate on the a.k.a. (also known as), you would understand the reason that I have titled the song this way. I don’t want to reiterate everything that I have said because you can study the issue yourself. I will remind you, however, as I have stated above, that many in the military hear il silenzio played by Melissa as a form of Taps.
    To Ursula, the dates are correct.

  • Fred Arbogast December 1st, 2010 at 2:49 pm

    PO2 David L has it correct. The Italian pop recording and video and the 13 year-old trumpeter video, are both very well done and insprirational. But calling them both Taps is incorrect!! Taps was written by Butterfield over 100 years before the Italian popular song was recorded and for the buggle. It was originally called “Lights Out”, signaling the soldiers to turn their lights out in the barracks. Whether the Italian song was taken from Taps is moot. A buggle is a brass instrument with no valves. That means it’s tones are limited to it’s fundamental and harmonic overtones. It cannot modulate into another key as the Italian song does. And when playing the limited number of harmonic tones, any combination will sound very similar. So while the Italian song stays in concert Bb, a buggle pitched in Bb will sound very similar. I have been a brass player (trombone) for decades and been in the Army . . . and know what I’m talking about. This whole discussion is silly at best and ingorant at worst! By the way, my college fight song is “Lights Out”.

  • Cris Smith December 16th, 2010 at 4:06 am

    A brief history of the Last Post follows.

    Il Silenzio requires an instrument with valves to allow more than the regular six notes available to a bugler.
    A trumpet is any instrument where the tube tapers from the mouthpiece to the bell end.
    Therefore, a bugle is, technically, a trumpet – but a trumpet ain’t a bugle.I play both.

    The British started playing the bugle call ‘Last Post’ about the 17th century and the Americans picked it up during one of their wars in about 1860. The tune has been amended and rewritten several times.
    The Last Post originated as one of the series of bugle calls made during the day to mark significant chronological events such as ‘reveille’ (get up), ‘Lights Out’ etc. Often, different units had completely different calls to avoid confusion.
    The First Post was sounded as the orderly officer, the orderly sergeant and a drummer (with a bugle) started the Tattoo and walked around checking the sentry positions in the late evening. They marched from post to post with the drummer beating his drum (it seems military tactics and subtlety were unheard of in those times). Upon reaching the final post the drummer would sound the Last Post. Drummers were multi-tasking even then.

    The association with funerals and memorial days came later, probably due to its former name of ‘Extinguish Lights’ and the obvious connotations.
    The tune always played after the two minutes silence is the ‘Rouse’ – a difficult piece to play and, IMHO, unnecessary and certainly out of order at a funeral.

    Both the Americans and the British have, over the years, laid claim to the original tune and the jury is still out.
    The most reliable resource I have found attributes the current composition to a General Butterfield during the American Civil War, however I would be interested to hear the opinion of others. My sources are the often unreliable and highly US-centric internet.

    New Zealand Regular Force and Australia served alongside US troops in Viet Nam. 161 Artillery Battery was there from start to finish.

    Cris Smith, Auckland, New Zealand
    161 Battery (Viet Nam 1968-69), Loc Troop, and Camp Bugler (Waiouru Military Camp) for two or so years.

  • Cris Smith December 16th, 2010 at 4:38 am

    And, if you think Taps is a gut-ripper, fish around and find the Last Post. It is not trimmed to the bone like Taps and includes sections of other calls including Mess Call. When driving around New Zealand, I stop at any town’s war memorial and play the Last Post.
    Lest We Forget

  • Cris Smith December 16th, 2010 at 4:39 am

    And, if you think Taps is a gut-ripper, fish around and find the Last Post. It is not trimmed to the bone like Taps and includes sections of other calls including Mess Call. When driving around New Zealand, I stop at any town\’s war memorial and play the Last Post.
    Lest We Forget

  • Westbrook December 16th, 2010 at 12:36 pm

    So the debate goes on…
    Thank you for your comments Fred and Chris.
    I will remind you, however, as I have stated above, that many in the military hear il silenzio played by Melissa as a form of Taps. Bugle Calls is a collection of different songs, of which Taps is one of them. I took my cue from a military social network, TroopSpace.net, where Melissa’s version of Il silenzio is thought by many in the military as a rendition of Taps, and is included as one of their songs in their bugle calls. And as I mentioned above, Taps was originally written by Brigadier Daniel Butterfield, an American Civil War general in July, 1862

  • Cris Smith December 17th, 2010 at 2:45 pm

    Il Silenzio is not a bugle call.
    Il Silenzio cannot be played upon a bugle
    Your source/cue is incorrect.

    Your continuos use of the phrase ‘bugle call a.k.a. Taps’ is very confusing, try substituting ‘the bugle call known as Taps’.

    We are all talking about three DIFFERENT tunes here. Il Silenzio, Taps and the Last Post. However, they all rip us to bits. Let’s just lie back, chill out and enjoy them. I don’t give a rat’s bottom who wrote any of them.

    Thanks for the diversion – I’m out of here.

  • Terry February 6th, 2011 at 7:11 pm

    The young lady plays a beautiful variation of Il Silenzio BUT it is not “Taps”

    TAPS has 24 standardized notes and the notes are always played the same, with no melodic variation.

    Il Silenzio does sound a bit like the earlier melody “TAPS” but to suggest that the young lady is playing a variation of TAPS is totally false and misleading.

  • Franz Fehls February 11th, 2011 at 3:39 pm

    This young lady is doing things with her horn that it took me
    thirty years to do. I\’ve been playing for 63 years and am still
    envious of her mastering of breath and emboucher control.
    Franz Fehls

  • Danny Ebersold July 5th, 2011 at 11:25 pm

    This girl is amazing… HOWEVER… Il Silencio is NOT Taps. Two different things from two different sources. TAPS is much older and comed from the military bugle sound called Tattoo.(Or Scott Tattoo, Tattoo was played at night and indicated “Lights out”

    Il Silenzio is NOT a variation of Taps, although the notes and phrasing could have been “stolen” from Taps. Taps was written during the civil war era by a US soldier.

    Taps was written, or rearranged, by Brigadier General Daniel Butterfield in July 1862 at Harrison’s Landing, Virginia, and officially recognized by the US Army in 1874 and was used by both the Union and the South armies as a formal bugle call.

    Due to intermingling of various nations armys, many bugle calls sound similar and are hard for untrained people to tell apart. Because Bugles have NO valves they have limited numbers of notes that they can play. In an octave, say in the key of bflat, a bugle can only sound C, E, G and C within every octave that it can sound. With these limitations, and the numerous situations that buglers were required to play during their duties, many bugle calls sound similar and some people could claim that they ALL sound alike.

    Tattoo was a French bugle call and the song Il Silenzio is a song written by an Italian in the 1960s. The only similarities are the series of 3 notes that begin Il Silenzio. The song that the 13 year old girl plays is in fact the EXACT song Il Silenzio. I have the Trumpet duet music in my hands

  • Donald Smith September 22nd, 2011 at 2:26 am

    When I was 6 years old and in a hospital bed recovering from Polio surgery, I heard on the radio, Il Silenzio. I cried and wished the music would never stop. In my teens and in my 20’s and even in my 40’s, whenever I was in a record or music shop. I would ask if they had the music called “The Silence”. They never knew what I was asking for. Well I am 65 tonight and Now I have Finally found “The Silence”.
    I cried again. Thank you Very Very Much.

  • Jame H. King February 14th, 2012 at 10:40 am

    I think you are telling it backwards:

    First: Butterfield wrote taps! I can remember hearing “TAPS” all the way back to infancy and I am 73 yrs old. I will accept on hearsay that Butterfield wrote it in the 1860s.

    Second: in 1965 an Italian wrote Il Silencio, a variation and expanded piece in which he uses note for note parts of Butterfield’s Taps. It too is a very beautiful piece and I enjoy it immensely.

    Third: somebody wrote a variation on Il Silencio and (in my opinion) used bad judgement in naming it too; Taps.

    There is only one legitimate Taps. You can play around with it how you will, but you can’t improve upon perfection.

  • Alan Chaddon May 14th, 2012 at 4:34 pm

    As a former bugler and first seat trumpet player and also as a retired USN CPO, who also have heard the original El Silenzio played when stationed in Europe, this no matter how you call it is still one of the dearest and most moving memorials to those who have gone ahead of us. I am over 70 now and can remember hearing it from many years ago. Who wrote it and how they used it is immaterial today. What it stands for and how it is used today is what is important. Did I read all of the comments – No.

  • Westbrook November 25th, 2012 at 8:56 pm

    Thank all of you for your comments. I will remind you and repeat what I have said in many ways above that many in the military hear il silenzio played by Melissa as a FORM of Taps. Bugle Calls is a collection of different songs, of which Taps is one of them. I took my cue from a military social network, TroopSpace.net, where Melissa’s version of Il silenzio is thought by many in the military as a rendition of Taps, and is included as one of their songs in their bugle calls. And as I mentioned above, Taps was originally written by Brigadier Daniel Butterfield, an American Civil War general in July, 1862

    Read more: http://musicouch.com/musicouching/il-silenzio-and-bugle-call-a-k-a-taps/#ixzz2DHi03TIB

  • cjb6465 March 6th, 2013 at 5:02 pm

    I am a retired Vietnam veteran of the US Army and I have NEVER heard Il Silenzio play on any military post that I was assigned to, which by the way include some Air Force bases. I have hear TAPS play many time but only at military funerals, I’ve never heard it played at “lights out”.

    Although I have listened to Il Silenzio (I have a copy) many time I am totally convinced, although I can certainly hear how that mistake can be made, that Il Silenzio and TAPS are NOT one and the same nor is Il Silenzio a variation of TAPS.

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